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Summer Camps, 5/28/15

SUMMER CAMPS

Contributed by Provi Sharpe, Director of Emergency Management and Equipment Reuse, MDTAP

Many camps offer specialized care for specific disabilities or one-on-one buddies, while other camps provide tutoring for individuals with learning disabilities in addition to outdoor activities.  Here are some points to consider:

Keep in mind your camper’s age, needs and interests, as well as cost, duration and location.  Decide what your camper is emotionally and physically ready for.   If your camper has a physical disability, inquire about

  • accessibility features of buildings and/or cabins
  • air-conditioning or electrical outlets for assistive technology
  • accessible trails or paths
  • bathrooms
  • waterfronts or pools
  • emergency procedures
  • safety measures
  • transportation

Based on your camper’s needs, ask about how the camp handles medical and behavioral issues and emergencies and how they give updates to families.

To find a summer camp, check the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s resource listThe Arc of Baltimore offers a summer camp and vacation manual for children and adults with disabilities and their families. You can find it on their home page or go to the Resources tab and click Recreation in the drop down menu. Visit V-LINC  for information and to register for their Mary Salkever Inclusive Computer Arts Camp 2015, June 22 to June 26 and July 6 to July 10.

Global Accessibility Awareness Day

On Thursday, May 21, MDTAP participated in Global Accessibility Awareness Day. Around the world, events, both large and small, were held to raise awareness of Web Accessibility. Countless links and articles have been written as a result of GAAD2015. The best jumping off point may be:

www.baltimoregaad.org. The administrators say to keep checking back as it is being updated. Often.

The ADA National Network in collaboration with the Accessibility Program at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and the National Center on Accessibility at Indiana University is pleased to announce the 2nd and 3rd  sessions (2 Part Series) in the 2015 Arts and Recreation Webinar Series.

 

1st Webinar Session May 28, 2015: 

Title:  Part I:  Accessing the Cultural Arts – Considerations for Patrons Who Are Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing

Description:  Join us for this engaging webinar to learn about best practices for accommodating patrons and visitors with hearing loss! Topics include an introduction to hearing loss; the rights and responsibilities on the part of the patron and the performing arts venue; challenging listening situations and communication strategies; and assistive devices, services and technology. The session will wrap up with a facilitated question and answer session.

Presenter:  Valerie Stafford-Mallis, Business Development Manager, Alternative Communication Services (ACS) LLC

Time:   2:00pm-3:30pm ET (determine the start time based on your own time zone)

Registration:  Free and available at www.adaconferences.org/ArtsnRec

This program can be accessed via toll telephone (Carrier fees apply) and/or via webinar platform (Free of charge).   The session is closed captioned via the webinar platform.

Questions regarding registration and/or the content of the session should be directed to 877-232-1990 (V/TTY) or by email at webinars@adaconferences.org

 

2nd Webinar Session June 25, 2015: 

Title:  Part II:  The ABCs of Assistive Listening Technology

Description:  Assistive Listening Systems are an essential tool for providing effective communication. Choosing a system that will work in your space, and properly installing and maintaining that system are key to providing the highest quality experience for patrons and visitors.  In this webinar, presenters will review the requirements for assistive listening systems and the basic features of infrared, radio frequency and induction loop assistive listening systems. Participants will learn the pros and cons of each system, their legal obligations, and how to properly maintain the system.

Presenters:  Mark Annunziato, Vice President of Engineering and Operations, Sound Associates  (bio below) Representative from the U.S. Access Board (TBA)

Time:   2:00pm-3:30pm ET (determine the start time based on your own time zone)

Registration:  Free and registration will be available after May 28th at www.adaconferences.org/ArtsnRec

This program can be accessed via toll telephone (Carrier fees apply) and/or via webinar platform (Free of charge).   The session is closed captioned via the webinar platform.

Questions regarding registration and/or the content of the session should be directed to 877-232-1990 (V/TTY) or by email at webinars@adaconferences.org

 

There are new items available under the following categories:

Mobility, Seating, Positioning:     

  • Stair Lift – Free
  • Hoyer Lift – Best Offer
  • Wheelchair Lift – Free

 

Daily Living:  

  • Walk-In-Tub – $1,500 or Best Offer

 

Vehicle Mods and Transportation:

  • 2004 Town and Country Van with Handicap Modifications – $12,500 or Best Offer

For more information on these and other items please visit Equipment Link at www.equipmentlink.org or call us at (410) 554-9230 or (800) 832-4827.

HTML5 Structural Elements and ARIA

HTML5 introduces several new structural elements that will be very beneficial for accessibility: <nav> (for identifying navigational elements), <header> (a group of introductory or navigational aids), <article>, <aside> (tangentially related content, such as a sidebar), and <footer> provide meaning to major page structural areas. These can also be used to enhance keyboard navigation (a user could press the “N” key to jump to the page navigation, for example). Many HTML5 structural elements mirror or map to ARIA landmark roles:

  • <article> — role=”article”
  • <footer> — role=”contentinfo” (only one per page)
  • <header> — role=”banner”
  • <nav> — role=”navigation”
  • <aside> — role=”complementary”

If transitioning to HTML5, you will want to use both the HTML5 native element and the ARIA role (e.g., <nav role=”navigation”>) until assistive technology support for HTML5 improves. Of note is that ARIA provides very useful role=”search” and role=”main” that do not have HTML5 counterparts. The accessibility of nearly all web pages would be increased if these roles are implemented.

Contributed by Joel Zimba, Special Projects Coordinator, MDTAP

On June first and second, MDTAP staff will be attending the M-Enabling Summit – Conference and Showcase 2015. This two day gathering presents the state of the art in mobile technology, wearables and accessibility. I’m looking forward to learning about how the Internet of Things will change life for the disabled, and what a mobile-enabled smart home might be like. Perhaps items of interest from the ShowCase portion will appear in our Assistive Technology library. A link to the conference website is included below:

http://www.m-enabling.com/agenda.html

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